Thursday, October 2, 2008

Terminal Wildcards

Manipulating Files






This lesson will introduce you to the following commands:
  • cp - copy files and directories
  • mv - move or rename files and directories
  • rm - remove files and directories
  • mkdir - create directories

These four commands are among the most frequently used Linux commands. They are the basic commands for manipulating both files and directories.

Now, to be frank, some of the tasks performed by these commands are more easily done with a graphical file manager. With a file manager, you can drag and drop a file from one directory to another, cut and paste files, delete files, etc. So why use these old command line programs?

The answer is power and flexibility. While it is easy to perform simple file manipulations with a graphical file manager, complicated tasks can be easier with the command line programs. For example, how would you copy all the HTML files from one directory to another, but only copy files that did not exist in the destination directory or were newer than the versions in the destination directory? Pretty hard with with a file manager. Pretty easy with the command line:

[me@linuxbox me]$ cp -u *.html destination

Wildcards

Before I begin with our commands, I want to talk about a shell feature that makes these commands so powerful. Since the shell uses filenames so much, it provides special characters to help you rapidly specify groups of filenames. These special characters are called wildcards. Wildcards allow you to select filenames based on patterns of characters. The table below lists the wildcards and what they select:

Wildcard Meaning
* Matches any characters
? Matches any single character
[characters] Matches any character that is a member of the set characters. The set of characters can be expressed as a range of characters. (For example, [A-Z] represents all uppercase letters)
[!characters] Matches any character that is not a member of the set characters

Using wildcards, it is possible to construct very sophisticated selection criteria for filenames. Here are some examples of patterns and what they match:

Pattern Matches
* All filenames
g* All filenames that begin with the character “g”
b*.txt All filenames that begin with the character “b” and end with the characters “.txt”
Data??? Any filename that begins with the characters “Data” followed by exactly 3 more characters
[abc]* Any filename that begins with “a” or “b” or “c” followed by any other characters
[A-Z]* Any filename that begins with an uppercase letter. This is an example of a range.
BACKUP.[0-9][0-9][0-9] Another example of ranges. This pattern matches any filename that begins with the characters “BACKUP.” followed by exactly 3 numerals.
[!a-z]* Any filename that does not begin with a lowercase letter.

You can use wildcards with any command that accepts filename arguments.

cp

The cp program copies files and directories. In its simplest form, it copies a single file:

[me@linuxbox me]$ cp file1 file2

It can also be used to copy multiple files to a different directory:

[me@linuxbox me]$ cp file1 file2 file3 directory

Other useful examples of cp and its options include:

Command Results
cp file1 file2 Copies the contents of file1 into file2. If file2 does not exist, it is created; otherwise, file2 is overwritten with the contents of file1.
cp -i file1 file2 Like above however, since the “-i” (interactive) option is specified, if file2 exists, the user is prompted before it is overwritten with the contents of file1.
cp file1 dir1 Copy the contents of file1 (into a file named file1) inside of directory dir1.
cp -R dir1 dir2 Copy the contents of the directory dir1. If directory dir2 does not exist, it is created. Otherwise, it creates a directory named dir1 within directory dir2.

mv

The mv command performs two different functions depending on how it is used. It will either move one or more files to a different directory, or it will rename a file or directory. To rename a file, it is used like this:

[me@linuxbox me]$ mv filename1 filename2

To move files to a different directory:

[me@linuxbox me]$ mv file1 file2 file3 directory

Examples of mv and its options include:

Command Results
mv file1 file2 If file2 does not exist, then file1 is renamed file2. If file2 exists, its contents are replaced with the contents of file1.
mv -i file1 file2 Like above however, since the “-i” (interactive) option is specified, if file2 exists, the user is prompted before it is overwritten with the contents of file1.
mv file1 file2 file3 dir1 The files file1, file2, file3 are moved to directory dir1. dir1 must exist or mv will exit with an error.
mv dir1 dir2 If dir2 does not exist, then dir1 is renamed dir2. If dir2 exists, the directory dir1 is created within directory dir2.

rm

The rm command deletes (removes) files and directories.

[me@linuxbox me]$ rm file

It can also be used to delete a directory:

[me@linuxbox me]$ rm -r directory

Examples of rm and its options include:

Command Results
rm file1 file2 Delete file1 and file2.
rm -i file1 file2 Like above however, since the “-i” (interactive) option is specified, the user is prompted before each file is deleted.
rm -r dir1 dir2 Directories dir1 and dir2 are deleted along with all of their contents.

Be careful with rm!

Linux does not have an undelete command. Once you delete a file with rm, it’s gone. You can inflict terrific damage on your system with rm if you are not careful, particularly with wildcards.

Before you use rm with wildcards, try this helpful trick: construct your command using ls instead. By doing this, you can see the effect of your wildcards before you delete files. After you have tested your command with ls, recall the command with the up-arrow key and then substitute rm for ls in the command.

mkdir

The mkdir command is used to create directories. To use it, you simply type:

[me@linuxbox me]$ mkdir directory

Manipulating Files






This lesson will introduce you to the following commands:
  • cp - copy files and directories
  • mv - move or rename files and directories
  • rm - remove files and directories
  • mkdir - create directories

These four commands are among the most frequently used Linux commands. They are the basic commands for manipulating both files and directories.

Now, to be frank, some of the tasks performed by these commands are more easily done with a graphical file manager. With a file manager, you can drag and drop a file from one directory to another, cut and paste files, delete files, etc. So why use these old command line programs?

The answer is power and flexibility. While it is easy to perform simple file manipulations with a graphical file manager, complicated tasks can be easier with the command line programs. For example, how would you copy all the HTML files from one directory to another, but only copy files that did not exist in the destination directory or were newer than the versions in the destination directory? Pretty hard with with a file manager. Pretty easy with the command line:

[me@linuxbox me]$ cp -u *.html destination

Wildcards

Before I begin with our commands, I want to talk about a shell feature that makes these commands so powerful. Since the shell uses filenames so much, it provides special characters to help you rapidly specify groups of filenames. These special characters are called wildcards. Wildcards allow you to select filenames based on patterns of characters. The table below lists the wildcards and what they select:

Wildcard Meaning
* Matches any characters
? Matches any single character
[characters] Matches any character that is a member of the set characters. The set of characters can be expressed as a range of characters. (For example, [A-Z] represents all uppercase letters)
[!characters] Matches any character that is not a member of the set characters

Using wildcards, it is possible to construct very sophisticated selection criteria for filenames. Here are some examples of patterns and what they match:

Pattern Matches
* All filenames
g* All filenames that begin with the character “g”
b*.txt All filenames that begin with the character “b” and end with the characters “.txt”
Data??? Any filename that begins with the characters “Data” followed by exactly 3 more characters
[abc]* Any filename that begins with “a” or “b” or “c” followed by any other characters
[A-Z]* Any filename that begins with an uppercase letter. This is an example of a range.
BACKUP.[0-9][0-9][0-9] Another example of ranges. This pattern matches any filename that begins with the characters “BACKUP.” followed by exactly 3 numerals.
[!a-z]* Any filename that does not begin with a lowercase letter.

You can use wildcards with any command that accepts filename arguments.

cp

The cp program copies files and directories. In its simplest form, it copies a single file:

[me@linuxbox me]$ cp file1 file2

It can also be used to copy multiple files to a different directory:

[me@linuxbox me]$ cp file1 file2 file3 directory

Other useful examples of cp and its options include:

Command Results
cp file1 file2 Copies the contents of file1 into file2. If file2 does not exist, it is created; otherwise, file2 is overwritten with the contents of file1.
cp -i file1 file2 Like above however, since the “-i” (interactive) option is specified, if file2 exists, the user is prompted before it is overwritten with the contents of file1.
cp file1 dir1 Copy the contents of file1 (into a file named file1) inside of directory dir1.
cp -R dir1 dir2 Copy the contents of the directory dir1. If directory dir2 does not exist, it is created. Otherwise, it creates a directory named dir1 within directory dir2.

mv

The mv command performs two different functions depending on how it is used. It will either move one or more files to a different directory, or it will rename a file or directory. To rename a file, it is used like this:

[me@linuxbox me]$ mv filename1 filename2

To move files to a different directory:

[me@linuxbox me]$ mv file1 file2 file3 directory

Examples of mv and its options include:

Command Results
mv file1 file2 If file2 does not exist, then file1 is renamed file2. If file2 exists, its contents are replaced with the contents of file1.
mv -i file1 file2 Like above however, since the “-i” (interactive) option is specified, if file2 exists, the user is prompted before it is overwritten with the contents of file1.
mv file1 file2 file3 dir1 The files file1, file2, file3 are moved to directory dir1. dir1 must exist or mv will exit with an error.
mv dir1 dir2 If dir2 does not exist, then dir1 is renamed dir2. If dir2 exists, the directory dir1 is created within directory dir2.

rm

The rm command deletes (removes) files and directories.

[me@linuxbox me]$ rm file

It can also be used to delete a directory:

[me@linuxbox me]$ rm -r directory

Examples of rm and its options include:

Command Results
rm file1 file2 Delete file1 and file2.
rm -i file1 file2 Like above however, since the “-i” (interactive) option is specified, the user is prompted before each file is deleted.
rm -r dir1 dir2 Directories dir1 and dir2 are deleted along with all of their contents.

Be careful with rm!

Linux does not have an undelete command. Once you delete a file with rm, it’s gone. You can inflict terrific damage on your system with rm if you are not careful, particularly with wildcards.

Before you use rm with wildcards, try this helpful trick: construct your command using ls instead. By doing this, you can see the effect of your wildcards before you delete files. After you have tested your command with ls, recall the command with the up-arrow key and then substitute rm for ls in the command.

mkdir

The mkdir command is used to create directories. To use it, you simply type:

[me@linuxbox me]$ mkdir directory

http://www.linuxhaxor.net/2007/08/21/manipulating-files/

1 comment:

Drews said...

Hey guys i need help using wildcards IN MAC OSX TERMINAL, using the "ls" command with wildcards is not working like i think it should, for example: I am on the "/" folder and I type: "ls d*" and it shows a bunch of things (afsc_type5, ptyt4, ptyt5, ptyt6 etc) none of them starting with "d" as it should, or also I type "ls t*" and shows more files and folders BUT NONE STARTING WITH T, but if I type "ls m*" IT ACTUALLY APPEARS "mach_kernel". I have done many of this wildcard tests in my /Users/UserName/Desktop with folders i made and occurs the same thing, with some like "_", wildcards do work (or at least with the command "ls _*"), and with other letters like "c" it DOESNT WORK (Again, with the command "ls c*") Guys this is so strange because the same combination but changed the command wildcards do work. I really need some help, I have just started with terminal and I can't figure this out

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